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Source: Salon.

Watching or playing sports is usually a time when we can turn off our politically engaged (and anxious) minds to enjoy a sweet nine innings or an alley-oop, without a care for the world off the field or the court. But it would be foolish to suggest athletics don’t get political.

The good news is that sports can often be an arena where connections are made between nations and people. That’s certainly what happened on Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh Trail, when ultra-endurance mountain bike athlete Rebecca Rusch endeavored to retrace the trail with an emotional stop at the location where her American pilot father, who was shot down when she was three years old, died during the Vietnam War.

In the new documentary “Blood Road,” director Nicholas Schrunk follows Rusch’s personal quest for closure.

The film is now available on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, and Vimeo.

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